What’s it worth? Carnival target appraisal

carnival target
back of carnival target

Alice asks: I’ve been trying to find out the value of a circus target shooting item. It’s wrought iron, I just sand blasted it. It has to be 50-60 years old. My husband bought it from a friend over 40 years ago and that person had it for several years. There is a number on the back #740


AW says:
I think it’s a little older than that, I’d say it’s circa 1920s or 30s. It’s a Carnival target, not really a circus target. These were used as you probably know in booths where you could win a prize if you knocked the target over. The # on the back is a model or style #. Date range: 1920s-30s

 

Retail value:

$85-$125

 

Wholesale value: $45
(The midrange price you could expect to achieve at a well advertised live auction. The price that is most often realized)

Quick sale value: $25
The price your likely to get if you have to sell your item immediately and your prospective customer is aware of this.

Common trade terminology: carnival target, cast iron target, carnival demon.

Nicknames or slang terms: N/A

Selling tips: eBay is often a great place for unusual items, but any nice antique show or flea market would likely bring success if this is market right. It would make a nice addition to any auction ad as well.

In most cases, I believe it would be beneficial for your to give the prospective buyer a link to this page.

Care and storage tips: Not much will damage this, it’s made to take abuse and is expected to have wear.

What’s it Worth? Appraisal for Gone With the Wind Lamp

 

 

Please find attached pictures of a Gone with the Wind Lamp I would like to have appraised. The lamp came from the estate of Mrs. A.M. Green of Amory, MS who passed away at the age of 91 in 1966. This is not a reproduction.

 

I look forward to your response.

 

Thank You

 

William

 

AW says: That’s a great Gone with the Wind lamp, I especially like the embossed lions on globes, those are very Victorian. Unfortunately, this has been electrified as many of these have been and that does take down the value. My appraisal reflects this conversion.

Date range: 1880-1910

 

 

Retail value: $175
(top price)

Wholesale value: $75-$95

What you could expect to achieve at a well advertised live auction. The price that is most often realized)

Quick sale value: $50
The price your likely to get if you have to sell your item immediately and your prospective customer is aware of this.

Common terminology, nicknames, keywords: Gone with the Wind lamp, Vicotrian oil lamp converted, hand painted, milk glass.

Care and storage tips: If shipping you’d want to double box these. As it is, most of the value lies in those beautiful globes.

 

 

 

 

 

William asks:

 

What’s it Worth? Appraisal for Nokes and Nicolai antique drums


Valerie asks:

The items are antique drums and noisemakers. There is a bass drum with a trap door on the exterior and a snare drum. They are made of wood. The snare has bird’s eye maple on the sides. The dimensions of the bass drum is 27” in diameter and 14” deep. The dimensions of the snare is 15” in diameter and 4” deep.

The manufacturer is “Nokes and Nicolai”. The metal label on the bass drum says: “Nokes and Nicolai-Drum, Tympani, Orchestra Bells, Xylophones, and Chimes. 3 Appleton Street, Boston, Mass.” The tag on the snare says, “Nokes and Nicolai-Boston, Mass.” One skin on the bass is torn, the other is intact. It says,”Herbert Stevens-Newtonville, Mass” on the skin that is torn. The skins on the snare are not damaged. I also have a variety of antique noisemakers…a wood block, jingle bells, cow bell,etc., as well as the sticks for the bass drum, triangle,and sheet music holder in the shape of a lyre.

Looking forward to getting your opinion! Thanks, Valerie


AW says:  Note to readers, the bass drum not in the photo, but I have seen it.

 That’s quite a collection. Antique drums in the US were mostly mfgd in New England, as yours were. The pieces are turn of the century. They are neat, but there is not a complete enough drum set to demand top dollar. A complete set from these era, or one close to it, would be very rare indeed. My appraisal is for the collection. I like the fact that the wood is birds-eye Maple. That should polish up nicely.


Date range: 1890-1910

Retail value: $250-$325
(top price)

Wholesale value: $175-$200
(The midrange price you could expect to achieve at a well advertised live auction. The price that is most often realized)

Quick sale value: $100
The price your likely to get if you have to sell your item immediately and your prospective customer is aware of this.

Common trade terminology: Antique Drums, Nokes and Nicolai,

In most cases, I believe it would be beneficial for your to give the prospective buyer a link to this page, and to bookmark it via your favorite bookmarking service.

Care and storage tips: I don’t often recommend polish on antiques, but I like the idea of putting a lemon oil on these to give a little moisture to the wood. I would certainly treat the wood before putting new drum heads on these. I would love to hear these vintage drums with new heads! I think your best way to sell them would be to a drummer who want’s them to use and get a crazy sound out of!