What’s it Worth? Appraisal for 1889 University of Wisconsin Foot Ball Team Photo

  

Ben asks:

We inherited a house in Madison, WI. The man who used to live here worked for the University of Wisconsin as an engineer in the heating department. He was an avid collector of all sorts of things. We found this picture in the house. We don’t have much information on it. I’ve included pictures of some writing on the back as well.

Thank you!

AW says: That’s a great item Ben! There are several factors that determine the value of this old photo. One is whether or not there are others out there, and how many. I can assure you there are not a lot of them around.

This is known as a sepia tone photo, (caramel color) and it is an original Victorian era photograph.

The fact that this is the first team has value, it’s a good photo in it’s original frame, and the names are indicated, are all on the plus side.

If you were going to sell it, I would put it in a well advertised sports or memorabilia auction, and let the Unv of Wisconsin know that it’s for sale.

With a very rare item like this, you should know that an auction sale of it could blow away the appraised value if collectors get passionate about it.

 Date range: 1889

 Retail value:

$500 -$750

Wholesale value: $200-$300
(The mid range price you could expect to achieve at a well advertised live auction. The price that is most often realized)

Quick sale value: This should not have to suffer a quick sale value.
The price your likely to get if you have to sell your item immediately and your prospective customer is aware of this.

Common terminology, nicknames, keywords: University of Wisconsin first Foot Ball, Football team, sepia tone, victorian football photo, early sports memorabilia, Kerr, Logeman, Loup, Sheldon, Brooks, Sumner, Blackburn, Mayers, Ackerd, Brumder, Prail, McNaught, Bruce

Care and storage tips: NEVER take the paper back off of this.

What’s it Worth? Appraisal of Sepia Tone WWII Photograph

  Brady asks:

 

Dear Sir;

I have in my possession an interesting photograph, a sepia tone I believe. It is a picture of a WWI battleship (SMS Posen) and what I presume is a very large portion of her crew on the deck. There is much writing on the picture from a third party with an “X” marked by a figure who is labeled as the first officer of the crew (a “I. Offizier Schultze). Most of this writing is unintelligible but I can make out the name of the ship and the date (1.6.1911-I am not sure if this means January 6th or June 1st). As for the photo itself, it has a logo of some sort in the lower right hand corner stating “Atelier Kloppmann Wilhelmshaven” I have a deep background in military history of Germany and know that Wilhelmshaven was a major naval port, however, from my research the Posen was laid down and commissioned in Kiel in 1910 although another ship of her class (SMS Nassau) was laid down at Wilhelmshaven, however, “Posen” is so well-represented in the photo that I very much doubt it is any other ship. Also, there are no turrets that I can see on the ship or even exposed gun barrels, which is very odd. A number of figures in the photo are holding shovels scrawled with various words and markings; one figure in the lower right holds a shovel denoting “Welt Record”-World Record, at least three other shovels in the picture are scrawled with the following:
I. VI. 1911
642t. in
1. Stunde

It is certainly possible that there are in fact 642 crew in the picture and the last line of the above writing means “one hour” with the “in” in the second line meaning “in” as in “in one hour”. What the 642t. is…I have no idea. Another shovel in the picture, almost too small to make out states:

“Uns kann keener” (“We can be brave/bold???)

A few helpful facts about SMS Posen:
Crew Complement: Peacetime:966 men, Wartime:~1300
Laid down: August 1907
Launched: December 12th, 1908
Completed Trials: Sept. 21st, 1910
Built at: Germania Yard, Kiel


AW says: Thanks so much, that’s an interesting piece of history. The Posen, if that is the ship, was a WWI battle ship of an unsuccessful German fleet. Obviously the crew broke some kind of record, most likely involving speed. Since, it was such a feat, it’s unlikely that this is a one of a kind photo, but I too, believe it’s an original.

Posen saw service in the Baltic sea in the beginning of World War I, and in August 1915 participated in the Battle of the Gulf of Riga. Later, assigned to the I Battle Squadron, along with her sisterships, she participated in the Battle of Jutland on 31 May–1 June 1916. Posen fired 106 28 cm (11 in) shells during the battle, and received no damage.

Following the end of World War I, the ships were surrendered to the victorious powers as war booty. SMS Posen was surrendered in April 1920 to Japan. With no use for the ship, Japan sold her to a British wrecking firm which then scrapped her in Dordrecht (Netherlands). Nassau and Rheinland had the same fate. Westfalen was surrendered in 1920 to Britain and scrapped in 1924.


Date range: 1912-1915

 


Retail value:
$125
(top price)

Wholesale value:$40
(The mid range price you could expect to achieve at a well advertised live auction. The price that is most often realized)

Quick sale value: $20
The price your likely to get if you have to sell your item immediately and your prospective customer is aware of this.

Common terminology, nicknames, keywords: Posen battleship german wwI sepia tone photograph

Care and storage tips: Really needs no special instructions. 

Appraisal for antique Chiropodist photo

 

sepia tone photograph

Kathryn asks:
This is an old photograph taken at the Third Annual Convention, B.C. Assn. of Chiropodists, Vancouver, B.C., Dec. 26 & 27, 1932, 19-1/2” x 7-1/2” in size, an original photo produced by A.1.

Commercial Photo Service, Vancouver, B.C. I also want to know where such a picture might be sold to someone that would appreciate it—there didn’t seem to be much like this sold on eBay.

There is a small amount of discoloration (the little rust-colored dots on the back) and a few little pock-marks on the front (from the picture being unprotected, no doubt—I had trouble getting a good picture of the pockmarks as the picture curls a little bit).
However, the wavy vertical mark beside the man’s head in the photo of the man with the hat is actually part of the picture (the background behind the heads of the subjects of the photo).
Thanks—I look forward to hearing from you.

AW says: Thanks for the opportunity to appraise your photo. While this is a relevant piece of history to someone no doubt, it shares the same status many vintage photos do in that, it’s audience of collectors is very narrow.

If they were in uniform, or if you knew for sure someone of prominence was in the photo, that would be a different story.

I do like that it’s somewhat of a panoramic size which makes it a bit more salable, and it’s in reasonably good condition. It gets the most points for being the subject of an obsolete or evolved profession as I don’t think there are many practicing Chiropodists anymore!

I would try any Chiropractors or Podiatrist clubs or collectors, to try to market it it to.

Date range: 1932 

Retail value: $35

Wholesale value: $10-15
(The midrange price you could expect to achieve at a well advertised live auction. The price that is most often realized)

Quick sale value: $5
The price your likely to get if you have to sell your item immediately and your prospective customer is aware of this.Common trade terminology: Vintage photo, chiropractor photo, podiatrist photo, chiropodist photo

Care and storage tips: The rolling will not hurt it’s value, but be careful it not to dent the edges when tucking the roll away as many people often do.