What’s it worth? Appraisal for antique Lincoln photograph.

 antique Lincoln photograph antique Lincoln photograph label

Hiker asks:

The item is a photograph I noticed just laying around in a friends basement, so I asked him if I could research it. Pictures are attached.

On the back is a label that says:
“From FREDERICK KEPPEL & CO.”
“Rare engravings and etchings”
“No. 4 East 39th Street, New York
“No. F 5823 Portrait of Lincoln”
“Photograph from life.”
Additionally, the back lining of the picture is torn, and there is writing underneath it that I can’t make out which appears to be in pencil.
Its measurements are 7 3/8 x 9 (measuring the frame edges).



AW says:
Frederick Keppel & co. were Gallery Owners, show promoters and producers.

 

They would buy the rights of works and reproduce photos from photographers and artists and exhibit them at shows and then sold them, hence the stock#F 5823. This is what your item is, antique reproduction of an earlier photo.

As an immensely popular President, there are a great many reproduced photos of Lincoln, although your photo of Lincoln is a not an original, there is a growing demand for early photos and yours is by no means worthless.

A classic item like this will grow in value.

Date Range Made: 1890s

Retail Value: $100.00.

Wholesale Value: $65.00
(The midrange price you could expect to achieve at a well advertised live auction. The price that is most often realized)

Quicksale Value: $30.00.

The price your likely to get if you have to sell your item immediately and your prospective customer is aware of your desire to sell quick.

Common Trade Terminology: Lincoln unbearded. Lincoln Portrait Photo in Mourning Frame.

Slang Terms: Not applicable.

Selling Tips: This item would sell best on eBay, or a live auction with like items. You’ve done a wonderful job taking ample detailed pics, if you do sell it on eBay, I’d use ALL of the pictures you took.

Care and Storage Tips: Keep in a cool dry place away from harsh light. If shipped it should be double boxed to protect the glass.